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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the e.u. blasting the new tax on financial transactions hurting investors worldwide, and you warned me, this is big news. very important. >> it's a developing story. we got the letter here, 11 countries in the e.u. are moving to assess a tax on trades around the world meaning stocks and bonds meaning it could hit your 401(k) account and not know it's happening. the e.u. is in recession, 11 countries want the new tax, and we got the letter coming from the big mutual fund companies, ici, and the big bangs -- banks. they say, look, this is a really bad idea, guys, because, essentially, it's going to hurt investors around the globe. let's go through it. what they say is essentially increased trading costs dramatically reduce financial transactions, diminish liquidity, meaning increased volatility that hurts investors, and it's job killing with historic records of jeblessness around the globe. breaking news, the u.s. treasury talking to fox business, and the u.s. government opposes this new e.u. tax. they do not support it. let's put the statement from the treasury on the screen. the proble
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
to review by scientists at regulatory agencies. the 2008 e.u. risk assessment for pdcpp using all the best information available concludes that tdcpp gives no reason for concern to human health in relation to the physics chemical properties. couch manufacturers are mandated by law to use it in the foam stuffing. it's a little known law in california known as technical bulletin 17 which says the couch must be able to withstand exposure to a small flame for 12 seconds without igniting. while the regulation applies only to california, manufacturers use it in all the products instead of creating special furniture for the west coast. >> that is what is left after a couple minutes of burning. >> i believe fire retardant is good but they should use other chemicals or safe chemicals that doesn't affect the breathing of other people involved in it. they should find other methods to make the fire retardant safer. >> reporter: there are no warning labels so you don't know what chemicals are inside your couch. >> even if i wanted to make a choice about it, i wouldn't have been able to plaque a choice.
move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. in the last 12 months, we have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without
in western and north western africa. they are considered or seen by the e.u., france, as the least problematic state of the sierra. the number of youth recruited into al-qaeda so far remains very small, and they attack on soil, lack sophistication. capabilities are extremely limited, and it's affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. the government's aggressive pursuit and imprisonment pursuit of violence extremists temporarily disrupted the growth, but like other countries, niger, are faced with the challenge of ensuring control over the borders. i mean, mori tan ya shares a long border with mali, 2240 kilometers. it's even more than algeria which it shares 1300 kilometers a border with mali. border management plays a key role in counter in all forms of smuggling and, also, as i said the fighters in northern mali, so they have adopted an aggressive approach to fight violent extremists, more than the neighbors, definitely more than mali. for example, they equipped its airport, three airports with i.t. systems. it has full passport readers, it has built 27 # -- 27 posts t
with asean, singapore, japan and korea. and we're also in dialogue with the eu. we have been talking about a bilateral investment treaty, but not necessarily with a due sense of urgency. for meeting since negotiations started in 2007 does not suggest a great deal of haste. much as it might surprise, we want this as much as you did because it is also of interest to us. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, market access issues, and goods and services, and i to be seen perspective for they can be made to define narrative. why we must work to sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to let such issues define the relationship. this is why we have proposed to create an ad hoc clearinghouse mechanism to discuss market access issues in the trade policy forum. i believe that we also need to find a new positive narrative that can bind our countries closer together. one such opportunity i feel is in the energy sector. without a shirt access to energy inputs in sufficient quantities, we will not be able to sustain our economic development. therefore, an enduring in the u.s. partner
with the eu. not necessarily with a decent of urgency. it does not suggest a great deal of pace. it may surprise you that we want this as much as you do. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, services can be seen in perspective " for be made of the defining narrative. while we must sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to define racial profiling. we will discuss market access issues at the trade policy forum. we also need to find a positive narrative that will bind our countries together. one is in the energy sector. without access to energy inputs, we will not be able to sustain economic development. therefore, an enduring partnership should not only cover technological and regulatory aspects, but established commercial partnerships. as the u.s. becomes a net exporter of energy, we hope we can develop mutually beneficial partnerships. renewable energy, biofuels and emission technologies. in each of these cases, there can be immediate benefits for both sides. you're interested in exporting natural gas and exporting to non fta countries would help stabilize internat
, but not much more than that. the eu is providing non-legal aid, i am wondering if the u.s. is considering this? and if you are ceding influence for the ron. afghanistan has asked u.s. troops to leave the province and i think within two weeks, can we get your comment on that? >> with respect to afghanistan, i understand the concerns they have expressed. appropriately, when a complaint they may have thought to be appropriately evaluated. they will be, i assure you. i have taken appropriate note and i have had a great deal of involvement in afghanistan with president karzai. there are evaluations of how things might have gone wrong or might have changed. we are working on a bilateral security arrangement and this transition process. we have had a very good conversation with the president. president obama talked to him before making announcements. we have listened very carefully to his observations about wanting to speed up the transition with respect to management of security. i can assure you that we are finely attuned to the needs of the afghan people, and the most effective ways to make this t
. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can really keep a momento for growth or resume a momen
an eye on the meeting of finance minsters from the 17 eu countrys that use the euro. taking a live look at the big board, the dow is down 30. the nasdaq is down 6. s&p down 2. >>> apple could soon come out with something new. the new york times says apple is testing a new device that's worn like a watch. the paper says the device is made of glass and runs on a mobile operating system. analysts say apple products already have fashion appeal so the idea of wearing an apple product is not much of a stretch. >>> australian lawmakers want to know why their citizens must pay so much for iphones, ipads. an iphone that sells for $500 in the u.s. costs $540 there despite the australian dollar being worth than the u.s. dollar. >>> 7:45. well, an investigation by san francisco city attorneys into how some city employees used city computers should wrap up soon. the p.u.c. is working with the district attorney to investigate that several work employees used the computers to download pornography and gamble online. the inappropriate use of looking at explicitly sexual materials and gambling online can
in its history. officials say there is a broad framework in place. even if the deal clears the eu, it must also pass the european parliament. the u.s. trade deficit unexpectedly narrowed in december. according to the commerce department, the trade gap fell on the drop of oil imports and hire exports. 16% say they are late at least once a week. the most common excuse is traffic. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ [ shapiro ] at legalzoom, you can take care of virtually all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. your financial advis should focus on your long-term goals, not their short-term agenda. [ male announcer ] join the nearly 7 million investors who thinlike you do. face time and think time make a difference. at edward jones, it's how we me sense of investing. dagen: talk about a recovery. the number of homes sold for $5 million or more hitting a record number in california last year. that is where we find robert gray. in the holl
. >> now we go into a full eu heads of state summit. it will be interesting to see if that theory about the euro gains further traction. >> let's roll out the red carpet and watch for the arrivals. thanks, simon. let's get to rick santelli in chicago, where we're still talking about your punch bowl this morning, rick. >>> i'll tell you what, it never ceases to amaze me where somebody like mr. rubin could say nobody could have nope, and yet the government singles out s&p. there's more to this story, or maybe there isn't. like i said, you can't fight city hall. one guy always fighting the battle keeping us informed about what may or may not be happening in europe is mark brand, southwest securities. mark, you were just listening to mr. draghi, and many of your comments, along with many traders on this floor, everyone was wondering when a big salvo to lower the value of the euro will be emanating from europe to keep up with the japanese. has that day arrived? >> no, the day hasn't arrived ye. i'll tell you what has arrived. the way the eu works with the 17 people and the 17 countries in th
either by europe at large, the e.u. or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exists in the world. they're no longer, i think, worried about our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. >>brian: we're not worried about china hacking and taking our intellectual property. >> with respect, i think the vice president is flatout wrong. it does affect us economically what happens over there. chaos in europe, mass recession in europe, the fallout, maybe the collapse of the euro currency, that does affect us economically but also politically. can president obama now go on a road show as he will today and push for higher taxes which is what got italians into trouble? can he push for maximum infliction of pain on america? can he do that in light of what just happened with the voters in europe? i suspect there are economic and political fallout in america from what happened yesterday in italy. >>brian: if he could do that by not connecting the dot, a responsible leader would connect the dots and talk about how they're related. i'm not an expert on italian politics, but when
works. now when you work on a problem like this, as we do in the u.s., perhaps not at the scale the e.u. will, we'll find out. you learn not only more things about the brain but you learn how to build better computers and circles around and all boats rise. but the one mess age i want to leave with you with is that basic research still done in universities primarily including this new world of use inspired basic research with good interaction with companies and so forth producing the independenceble feed stock for companies and especially for young entrepreneurial companies that increasingly drive innovation, products, and jobs. mr. chairman, rajing member johnson, thank you for the opportunity to be here. i'll be happy to answer any questions. >> thank you. thank you for your testimonies today. i'll recognize myself for five minutes to ask questions and mr. templeton i would like to address my first question to you. let me preface by saying this in the united states every year $400 billion is spend on research and development. about $140 billion comes from the federal government. those
. tell your story about how family and medical leave has helped you, how much more eu could have been helped had not had the financial stresses that i am sure exist in families when they have to take unpaid leave. asked them both to amend the family and medical leave so more people can take it for more reasons and how much you need paid leaves. host: what exactly is a national partnership? caller: we are a national advocacy group that works on access to quality health care, that works on issues like workplace fairness and to ensure workers can be responsible family members. this is why we are advocates for expanding medical leave. it it is a labor of love for us to help working families secure the health care they need. we are a nonprofit organization that receives donations that are tax deductible from foundations and individuals. host: you can go to their web site nationalpartnerships.org. caller: i want, i think it is great the work you have done. it is great you're able to use that. about 10 years ago i had a 16 year old daughter that had a dui. i found that she was involved in dr
is a challenge t to all of us on both sides of the 50eu8, bot-- bothsides of the aisle, bs of the rotunda, to take the student debt crisis seriously. madam president, i yield the floor and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: william quorum call:
range hope that the u.s.-eu freed trade agreement which was mentioned by president obama's in tuesday night's state of the union address might help job wise on both sides. remember, $650 billion a year in trade on both sides of the atlantic, a two-way trade deals. again that is a couple years down the road. bill: greg, thanks. hang in there. it's been a long road. greg palkot out of london today. martha: this story is shocking the country today. in 2012 he made history when he competed in the olympic days. today he has been charged in a murder. new details in the stunning says of this track champion accused of killing his girlfriend. bill: why would a first grade teacher be suspended after playing hide and seek with his students? that ace good question. is a good question. >> there are things that you can and can't do. reall really you can't do security off the cuff. have you to train and prepare for it. i'm tasting both the yogurt and the honey at the same time. i'm like digging this yogurt thing. i feel healthy. new honey bunches of oats greek. but take comfort. it may not be you; i
a letter asking the e.u. to declare hezbollah a terrorist . >> one minute remaining. >> the terrorist organization in 2007 while killing our soldiers in iraq. he refused to sign a letter to president george w. bush talking -- he said to engage direct, talks with the government of iran. he was for that telling bush to do it. he voted against the iranian sanctions. he was one of two senators who failed to sign a letter to president clinton showing unconditional support for the state of israel. i would argue his record when it comes to iran and vale and statements he made put him well out of the mainstream and "the washington post" is right on the fridge. and now is the time to have somebody on the fringe of iran and israel serving as secretary of defense for the reason. ly vote no. debate should continue and when we get back unless there's a bomb shell. thank you. >> thank you. i yield the floor. senator from michigan. >> yield five minutes for the senator of wfd. >> senator from west virginia. >>. >> madam president. proudly support chuck hagel for secretary of defense. if he can make
negotiations with europe on a u.s.-eu trade ownership. we could not agree more. let's hurry up and put american business to work. let's get these deals done. by the way, it is not just about asia. it includes all the coasts of the united states and canada and america. it is fascinating. we need to get this going and move that european deal. the working group is about to put out a report. i think it will probably sustain the best teams we can think about. let me give you this in a minute. europe is in a slow economy. europe is our largest export partner. europe is china's largest export your. china is our fastest growing export partner. if europe goes into the can, the whole triangle goes in the can. that is a bad idea. this would be huge on both sides of the pond. there are a lot of big trade agreements that have been talked about or a long time. these would put cash on the table right now. it is important that we welcome global investment. we want people to bring their cash here. come here and invest or come here and visit. the terrorism is a great way -- tourism is a great way. we like that.
financial crisis, the fee future of the eu and the eurozone as well as developments happening in north africa. then as he moves across into the gulf where he'll talk in turkey and to leading gulf nations there, the topics are likely to be syria and also what's happening with respect to iran. there's a very important negotiating meeting this week where the so-called p-5 plus 1 lead negotiators will get together with iranian officials and see if something can be negotiated on iran's nuclear program. >> p.j., i want to ask you also what yesterday was. it marked bradley manning's 1,000th day in custody without a trial. he of course the army private accused of leaking the classified materials to wick leaks. you left the state department after getting in a little bit of hot water after saying the pentagon was treating manning unfairly. three years later, what are your thoughts on him now? >> for a caveat, the formal trial has not begun, but there is a legal proceeding under way, you know, regarding the charges and a potential, you know, plea-bargain. so this is a very open and transparent le
for secretary of defense. hagel refused to sign a letter that asked the eu to declare hezbollah a designated terrorist group. he doesn't want to dictate foreign policy. the fact of the matter is members of congress who enact the legislation determining that it's illegal to provide support for terrorist groups like hezbollah and hamas and hagel said we need not to go at this alone and cross border support to defeat hamas and it's extremely troubling that the so-called future, perhaps future secretary of defense refuses to work across the pond, to ensure the safety of america. >> at a time when we are, remember, the netanyahu speech before the u.n. and showing the red and the bomb and tipping point. at a time when we have israel making real warnings about iran getting nukes and what israel would do in response this is the guy heading up the pentagon and obviously israel will want our help if they find themselves in an armed conflict with iran. what are the stakes for israel in seeing hagel? president obama is going to set that policy not hagel, right? but he's got some independent power. >> we
. but if the questioning gets difficult i'm going to try to look like i were him and direct the questions away from 3450eus. the central question is why is the economy not growing faster after a deep recession? and i think there are three primary reasons for that but before i state those reasons i would like to make one factual observation which is this is not the weakest recovery in memory. it is not the weakest of the last two. the 2001 recovery was substantially slower than this one. what is different about this one is it is not v shaped in the way professor points out in his testimony. it was after the deep recessions of 1975 and 1982. i think there are three reasons why that is. the first is this recession came from the popping of a bubble unlike the 1982 and 1975 recessions and popping bubbles are much more difficult to escape from the grips of than are the other. so in 1982 my dear friend paul voker rose the -- the interest rates rose to over 20% on mortgages. economic activity slowed dramically as interest rates came down that pinned up demand came right back. that is not having a do a lot of stru
countries don't have this issue, but think about the health care system would work for the e.u.. that is a closer model than the health care system that works for the health care system and thinking about one of our larger states adopting at so it is going to be recognizing that we have taken one step in terms of expanding coverage. we are still struggling with how to get a more efficient outcome oriented health care system and it is going to take a lot of changes over the next decade or two decades. we've been having some of these discussions in medicare since its inception. this isn't going to be so because one piece of legislation was passed. it was health care reform 1.0 triet hang on. the rest is going to becoming for the next decade or two. >> in our history we have had problems in the policy development and looking at health systems abroad because of ideology. it must be terrible. but i think that what is happening as we have identified a whole range of more technical issues. how to pay organizations, how-to and sent individual providers, how to engage the patience that
-- >> the u.s./eu free trade agreement. >> i disagree with that. >> they have big deficiencies, and actually a bulwark on standard setting -- >> you disagree with the idea of trade -- >> no i definitely think trade boosts growth and want to see more net exports. what i have never seen is a connection between free trade agreements and an increase in our gdp or even our positive trade balance. more often than not -- >> when you look at nafta, haven't they finally concluded that there were more jobs created here because we were selling more? >> no, in fact, nafta is a -- nafta is a good example -- >> trade balance with mexico went negative. i'm saying after nafta our trade deficit with mexico went from positive to negative. >> nothing happens in a vacuum. >> it's a -- >> but -- >> current -- >> intellectually -- >> don't you know that free trade -- >> absolutely. i'm all for free trade. the nafta we were just talking about, it was 1200 pages. it actually doesn't take that long to write a free trade agreement. the nafta and many others -- >> that was shorter than the health care reform bill? >>
some of the things necessary to live up to their commitment to the eu. does this throw a wrench into the works? >> i think we should be thinking about it. the somewhat untold story is that -- >> you heard of this guy before this? >> absolutely. >> was he funny. >> he's funny. it would be a little bit like -- >> jackie mason? >> no -- >> seinfeld. >> robin williams or somebody. he was big in the '80s this guy. he also has been a big part of the political satire, all the rest of it. very, very bright guy. but you know, it's almost an a listic party. it's july real just truly a protest vote. to my knowledge it's gotten over 25% of the vote, the latest thing i've seen. monti is the best of the best. i honestly believe that is one of the, you know, on democracies it's easier to give stuff away. >> two years ago he had just started and i asked why are these pictures of monti in a beach chair. and they all said send monti to the beach. that was two years ago. >> yeah, he's only been in there a group -- grillo is moving. five-star movement is only three years old. it's a very organized,
u.s. emissions are actually down, i think it is 8%. eu emissions are down like 9%. but chinese emissions are up 30%. look at, look at where the coal is being burned. i think in five years india is supposed to become the second largest burner of coal right behind china. so the global picture on emissions is, if the national one wasn't enough to make you cry, i mean, just sort of think globally as sort of where we're going, you know? so, that's the crying part. and you asked me bright spots so. i mean there actually are, there actually are some, relax, i mean, the news, car standards that were just promulgated will double fuel economy by 2020 five. california is moving ahead and i think is a real bright spot. rggi is strengthening their targets. that's a bright spot. the cap-and-trade in australia looks like, i mean, who knows, another government might fall over their program here but it's a bright spot. they have got a plan. they have got a program. south korea is thinking about instituting emissions trading. china has seven sort of experiments around the country looking at emis
overwhelmed either by europe writ large, the eu or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exist in the world. they are no longer i think worried about our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. but, and i don't think there is no, very little doubt in any circles out there about america's ability to be in position to lead the world in the 21st century. not only in terms of our foreign policy, our incredible defense establishment, but economically. i think the american people are ready to get up as a civil rights leader when i was coming up as a kid said, the american people are just tired of being tired. get up and move. you guys know that because it's happening in your state. you're probably feeling it in your fingertips more than most of us do here in washington. and as i said i think they know we're better positioned than any of the nation in the world to lead the world. and that's what i think they are so frustrated by what they see and don't see happening here in washington. and i think their frustration is turning into a little bit of anger. i found an inte
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)